Apr 23, 2019  
2018-2019 General Catalog 
  
2018-2019 General Catalog

Civil and Environmental Engineering


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Department Head: Paul Barr
Location: Engineering Laboratory 262
Phone: (435) 797-2932
FAX: (435) 797-1185
E-mail: paul.barr@usu.edu
WWW: http://www.cee.usu.edu/

Undergraduate Advisor:
Civil Engineering:
Engineering Advising Center, Engineering 314A, (435) 797-2705, leslie.buxton@usu.edu

Environmental Engineering:
Engineering Advising Center, Engineering 314A, (435) 797-2705, leslie.buxton@usu.edu

Graduate Advisor:
Marlo A. Bailey, Engineering Laboratory 211F, (435) 797-2783, marlo.bailey@usu.edu

Undergraduate Division Heads:
Civil Engineering:

Paul J. Barr, Engineering Laboratory 262, (435) 797-8249, paul.barr@usu.edu

Environmental Engineering:
David K. Stevens, Engineering 216, (435) 797-3229, david.stevens@usu.edu

Graduate Program Division Heads:
Environmental Engineering:
David K. Stevens, Engineering 216, (435) 797-3229, david.stevens@usu.edu

Geotechnical Engineering:
James A. Bay, Engineering Laboratory 266, (435) 797-2947, jim.bay@usu.edu

Irrigation Engineering:
Niel Allen, Engineering 227, (435) 797-3926, n.allen@usu.edu

Structural Engineering:
Marvin W. Halling, Engineering Laboratory 264, (435) 797-3179, marv.halling@usu.edu

Water Engineering:
Blake P. Tullis, Engineering 213, (435) 797-3194, blake.tullis@usu.edu

Transportation Systems Engineering:
Ziqi Song, Engineering 234, (435) 797-9083, ziti.song@usu.edu

Degrees offered: Bachelor of Science (BS) in Civil Engineering; BS in Environmental Engineering; Master of Engineering (ME), Master of Science (MS), Civil Engineer (CE) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Civil and Environmental Engineering; MS and PhD in Irrigation Engineering

Graduate specializations: Environmental Engineering, Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering, Hazardous Waste Management, Structural Engineering and Mechanics, Transportation Engineering, Water Engineering, Water Resources Engineering and Hydrology

Full Details of the learning objectives, assessment plan, student outcomes, and evidence of continuous improvement for these programs of study can be found at www.cee.usu.edu/assessment/undergraduate/abet-civil for undergraduate civil programs, www.cee.usu.edu/assessment/undergraduate/abet-environmental for undergraduate environmental programs, and cee.usu.edu/assessment/graduate/index for graduate programs.

Undergraduate Programs

Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering is the oldest branch of the engineering field, offering graduates numerous opportunities to attain important positions which have great influence on many of humankind's endeavors. Civil and Environmental Engineering is concerned with planning, designing, constructing, and operating various physical works; developing and utilizing natural resources in an environmentally sound manner; providing the infrastructure which supports the highest quality of life in the history of the world; and protecting public health and renovating impacted terrestrial and aquatic systems from the mismanagement of toxic and hazardous wastes. This includes designing and supervising the construction of bridges, buildings, dams, aqueducts, sport complexes, energy complexes, and other structures; irrigation and transportation systems (highways, canals, rapid transit lines, etc.); developing water resources for municipal, industrial, and recreational use; land reclamation, soil mechanics, and urban planning; and the control of water quality through water purification and proper waste treatment, as well as solving problems of air pollution and solid and hazardous waste management. Projects of this magnitude require engineers who can understand the relationships of environment, resources, and production, and who are able to design and implement programs and procedures which bring these projects into being.

The undergraduate Civil Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Students in this program take such courses as engineering graphics, surveying, mechanics, dynamics, numerical methods, mechanics of fluids and solids, hydraulics, hydrology, soils, engineering, structural design, and legal aspects of engineering. Students entering the professional program are required to have a basic knowledge of computer skills in the areas of operating systems, spreadsheets, word processing, and a programming language. Course requirements also include basic understanding of engineering principles, analytical geometry and calculus, linear analysis, principles of chemistry and physics, and physical geology. Students are also provided with a variety of technical electives which can develop areas of specialty and competence. A number of humanities and social sciences courses must also be completed, adding breadth of study and increasing employment opportunities. Passing the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination, the first step in becoming a licensed professional engineer, is required for graduation. Students should plan to take the exam after their junior year. Students in this program are recommended to purchase and use a graphing scientific calculator (must be able to do integration, vector mathematics, and have a numerical solver).

Graduates of the program are expected to have attained the following outcomes to prepare them to meet the Program Educational Objectives.

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environment, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturing, and sustainability
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. an ability to communicate effectively
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

The Program Educational Objectives for the Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering are that within five years:

1. Graduates will be successfully employed in civil engineering or related careers and will become independent thinkers and effective communicators, team members, and decision makers

2. Graduates will incorporate economic, environmental, social, ethical, and sustainability considerations into the practice of civil engineering and will promote public health and safety

3. Graduates will engage in life-long learning by pursuing advanced degrees or additonal educational opportunities through coursework, professional conferences and training, or participation in professional societies

4. Graduates will pursue professional licensure or other appropriate certifications

Environmental Engineering

Public demand for increasingly safer environments has resulted in unprecedented demands for competent, well-trained environment engineers. Expertise must be developed to focus on protection of public health from the mismanagement of toxic and hazardous wastes, and on the management and renovation of impacted terrestrial and aquatic systems.

The undergraduate Environmental Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org. The program is based on a strong engineering and science foundation developed in the pre-professional program from which an environmental engineering specialty can be developed in the balance of the four-year program. The four specialty areas from which a student may choose technical elective courses include: Occupational Safety and Health, Solids, Water, and Air. The Senior Design Project required of all Environmental Engineering students will demand that they synthesize the technical information they have learned in their undergraduate program to produce creative engineering solutions to particular problems. With the breadth and depth of training involved in this program, students successfully completing this degree will be well-qualified to productively and competitively enter the environmental engineering field or a graduate environmental engineering program of their choice. Passing the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination, the first step in becoming a licensed professional engineer, is required for graduation. Students should plan to take the exam after their junior year. Students in this program are recommended to purchase and use a graphing scientific calculator (must be able to do integration, vector mathematics, and have a numerical solver).

Graduates of the program are expected to have attained the following outcomes to prepare them to meet the Program Educational Objectives.

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environment, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturing, and sustainability
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. an ability to communicate effectively
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

The Program Educational Objectives for the Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Engineering are that within five years:

1. Graduates will be successfully employed in environmental engineering or related careers and will become independent thinkers and effective communicators, team members, and decision makers

2. Graduates will incorporate economic, environmental, social, ethical, and sustainability considerations into the practice of environmental engineering and will promote public health and safety

3. Graduates will engage in life-long learning by pursuing advanced degrees or additonal educational opportunities through coursework, professional conferences and training, or participation in professional societies

4. Graduates will pursue professional licensure or other appropriate certifications

Annual student enrollment and graduation data for the program are available from the USU Office of Analysis, Assessment, and Accreditation: www.usu.edu/aaa/

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering are the same as those described for the University in this catalog. Students in good standing may apply for admission to the department. In addition, students must maintain the academic requirements outlined for the College of Engineering .

University Honors Program

The University Honors Program offers students in all colleges and majors the unique opportunity to deepen their educational experience with hands-on practical applications of their academic knowledge. The Honors Program admits incoming, transfer, and existing USU students based on application. High achieving students with at least one year remaining are encouraged to apply.  See the University Honors Program catalog entry and website (honors.usu.edu) for more information.

 

Additional Information

For more information about Bachelor of Science requirements and the sequence in which courses should be taken, see Civil Engineering - BS  and Environmental Engineering - BS  or in the online catalog.

Concurrent BS/Master's Program

The concurrent BS/Master's program allows engineering students to begin taking graduate-level classes during their senior year. This permits them to complete requirements for both the BS degree and the master's degree concurrently during two years. Students in this program have a greater selection of graduate courses, since many graduate courses are taught during alternate years. In addition, the student's senior design project could be a start for a graduate design project or thesis. After completing their BS degree, students in the program can earn a master's degree in only one additional year. Both the BS and the master's degree can generally be earned with 155-159 total credits, although students should note that a Plan C MS requires 3 extra credits. Finally, students with a master's degree can expect a much higher starting salary following graduation. (For more information, see College of Engineering )

Graduate Programs

Admission Requirements

See general admission requirements. Admission committees consider GRE scores and experience, undergraduate record and curriculum, and formal recommendations. A student without an undergraduate civil and environmental engineering background may be required to complete selected undergraduate courses prior to admission as a fully matriculated graduate student.

Graduate Program Divisions

The graduate program in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is administered through six academic divisions, as described below.

Structural Engineering

The structural engineer is involved in the design, construction, repair, and retrofit of all types of structures: buildings, bridges, dams, and many others. The safety of the structures we occupy and utilize every day is the responsibility of structural engineers. They must be able to evaluate the loads placed on a structure, determine their effects on the structure, and select the appropriate materials and structural elements, or repair strategy, to withstand these loads. Today's structural engineer is using new space materials in the design of new structures or the retrofit of older structures.

Mathematics, physics, and materials science constitute a foundation for structural engineering. Structural analysis and design are added to this foundation and become the focus of the structural engineering program. Graduate students in the structures program also engage in structural mechanics, numerical methods, structural dynamics, geotechnical engineering, and the study of new structural materials. Current research in the structures area is focusing on the dynamic characteristics of structures, their potential response to earthquakes, and new seismic retrofit measures, using advanced composite materials, for older structures. Materials research is focusing on cementious materials and constitutive modeling.

Geotechnical Engineering

Engineering studies of soils are concerned with the physical and engineering properties of soils and how these are related to engineering projects.

Traditional geotechnical engineering includes the application of engineering principles to the analysis and/or design of building foundations, earth embankments, retaining walls, drainage systems, earthquake motion, buried structures, and other systems involving soil and rock. Engineers and architects cannot ignore the problems of investigating properties of soils in connection with engineering construction. Undergraduate and graduate courses offered by the department provide the basic knowledge necessary for the design of foundations and various types of earth structures. Fundamental concepts and their application are emphasized so that the student will be properly trained for his or her initial job, as well as being prepared to understand future development in this field.

The Geotechnical Engineering Division, in cooperation with the Environmental Engineering Division, is offering a new program in Geoenvironmental Engineering. This new program uses the strengths of both divisions to provide a program involving the geotechnical aspects of hazardous waste management, the investigation of hazardous waste sites, and the design of hazardous waste containment systems.

The geotechnical division has a strong research program. Current research projects in this division include studies on liquefaction, seismic slope stability, pile foundations, landslides, mechanically stabilized embankments, risk analysis of dams, finite element analysis of soil-structure systems, and the long-term properties of clay soils used in hazardous waste containment systems.

Water Engineering

The water engineering program is a multidisciplinary graduate program in the College of Engineering and is intended to enable engineers and scientists interested in water to obtain graduate degrees in the areas of fluid mechanics and hydraulics, hydrology, groundwater, and water resources engineering. Core courses and departmental offerings cover these fundamental areas, as well as essential numerical and statistical methods. The water engineering faculty are committed to a strong academic program. The curriculum offered is one of the most comprehensive offered in the U.S. Elements of ongoing research projects are routinely and effectively incorporated into the classes. The program combines training, research, and experience to understand the water issues and water resources management challenges in the United States and internationally. Graduate students can supplement departmental offerings by selecting courses in Mathematics and Statistics; Watershed Sciences; Applied Economics; Economics; Geology; Biological and Irrigation Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; and Plants, Soils, and Climate. This ensures that graduates are well-grounded in the fundamentals, but have a breadth of training and are prepared to contribute professionally to the solution of multidisciplinary local, national, and international water problems. Graduate students in the water program have the opportunity for research support through the Utah Water Research Laboratory (UWRL) while working on theses or dissertations. Excellent laboratory and computing facilities are available. Strong, continuous state and federal research funding keeps the research topics and facilities current. Specialty areas within the program comprise fluid mechanics and hydraulics, hydrology, groundwater, and water resources engineering.

Fluid mechanics and hydraulic engineering covers both fundamental principles and theory and their applications in a variety of engineering fields. Elementary fluid mechanics, based on fundamental principles of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum, is the logical core for all water-related engineering programs. Consequently, other specialties in water engineering study fluid mechanics. Students specializing in fluid mechanics and hydraulics emphasize theoretical fluid mechanics, hydraulic design, numerical methods, and laboratory hydraulic techniques. A good variety and balance of courses supporting research in theoretical fluid mechanics, open channel hydraulics, hydraulic design, transients, sedimentation, municipal water system design, and cavitation are available at the graduate level. Graduates in fluid mechanics and hydraulics find employment in a broad range of professional engineering fields, including consulting, university teaching and research, and state and federal government agencies.

Hydrology is a branch of geoscience concerned with the origin, distribution, movement, and properties of waters of the earth. The hydrologic cycle encompasses the atmosphere, the land surface, lakes and oceans, and the subsurface. Complex, interacting processes at varied time and space scales describe the hydrologic cycle. The concepts and practice of hydrology derive from an integration of field observations, laboratory investigations, and conceptual, mathematical, chemical, statistical, and probabilistic models.

The hydrology program at USU has strength in both theoretical and applied aspects of modern hydrology. Past and present research focuses on a broad spectrum of hydrologic problems. These range from climate modeling, rainfall processes, floods, droughts, terminal lake analyses, soil erosion, and stream water quality models to groundwater contamination characterization and remediation and watershed analyses. A particular emphasis of the program is on an understanding of the global water and energy cycles at nested scales from the hemisphere to the continent to the watershed from a holistic perspective that recognizes the two-way linkages between water reservoirs and fluxes through oceans, atmosphere, land surface and subsurface, and biota.

Groundwater engineering is concerned with fluid flow and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment. It encompasses the theory of flow in porous media; groundwater hydrology; fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface; and analytical, numerical, and stochastic modeling of such processes. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative analysis of physical and chemical principles governing these processes and on the application of these principles to practical field problems, with all their difficulties related to the complex structure of subsurface formations. Examples of such problems include groundwater supply and management, capture zone analysis, well hydraulics, subsurface cleanup technologies, health risk assessment, and analysis and remediation of groundwater contamination. These problems are of a multidisciplinary nature, and their solutions require a multidisciplinary approach, involving, among others, soil and water chemistry, chemical engineering, and economics. The groundwater professional is an important team player in solving such problems.

Water Resources Engineering prepares engineers to be lead members in water resources planning teams, often charged with coordinating the information and concepts supplied from other disciplines. This need for breadth requires considerable flexibility in the training and arrangement of degree programs.

Water resources engineers draw principles from hydrology, fluid mechanics, hydraulics, environmental engineering, economics, ecology, political science, and other disciplines in the design and operation of projects and nonstructural methods for water resources planning and management. They need a sound understanding of how water storage, delivery, and other management systems function; of criteria used in evaluating and selecting among alternatives; of the techniques of operations research that can be used in systems design; and of the institutional aspects of decision-making in the public sector. A focus area of the program is to develop decision support systems for sustainable water quantity and quality management in the United States and in developing regions of the world. Evolving information sources and tools, such as spatial data sets encoded in geographical information systems, climate forecasts, and cognitive models of the human decision process and societal group dynamics, are being integrated in representative institutional contexts.

An internationally-recognized specialized program has been developed in dam safety risk assessment. Students take classes in dam engineering; hydrology and hydraulics; geotechnical engineering; geology; decision analysis; risk assessment; probability and statistics; and natural resources economics, planning, and management. Students work on practical applications, as well as research projects, for improving the state-of-the art.

Environmental Engineering

The Division of Environmental Engineering is a multidisciplinary graduate program in the College of Engineering and provides coursework and research experience to enable engineers and scientists interested in the environment to obtain graduate degrees relating to potable water and waste treatment, toxic and hazardous wastes management, air quality management, natural systems engineering, and environmental impact assessment. The program provides an interdisciplinary educational approach to fundamental principles that can be applied to  environmental phenomena. Research and training projects are a part of the program and provide the student with appropriate research experience leading to a thesis or dissertation.

Hazardous Waste Management. This specialization has been developed within the broader scope of the environmental engineering program to provide an integrated approach for students with a BS in engineering or natural sciences to deal with the complex issues of toxic and hazardous waste. Aspects of toxic/hazardous waste management, including characterization, treatment, disposal, control, monitoring, and environmental impacts, are dealt with in this program.

Natural Systems Engineering is the study of the interaction of engineered systems with nature, emphasizing impacts to aquatic ecosystems. Techniques include assessment of aquatic habitat through computer simulation and model verification, quantification of aquatic habitat using remote sensing systems, and data analysis and display through integrated statistical and GIS approaches. These tools are used to evaluate impacts on threatened and endangered species, habitat enhancement, instream flow assessments, fish habitat, stream sediment, and hydraulic features.

A bioprocess engineering program has been developed as a cooperative effort between the Division of Environmental Engineering and the Biological Engineering Department. This program provides students with specialized coursework and research experience in areas of bioreactor processing of environmental materials and engineering scale-up of biologically-based environmental reactions. Areas of specialization include waste to energy, fermentation, composting, and industrial waste (agricultural and chemical) reuse, recycling, and technologies based on biological processes, as well as engineering optimization of aquatic habitats.

Irrigation Engineering

In the irrigation engineering area, USU has attained worldwide prestige through the successful professional contributions of its graduates during a period of 80 years. The CEE Department is substantially involved in overseas research and training activities, for example in the Dominican Republic, Armenia, and Tatarstan, concerned with managing irrigation systems, on-farm water management, water resource development, and soil assimilation and recycling of industrial residues. Specific research projects in the irrigation and drainage engineering option include hydraulics of surface irrigation, consumptive use, return flow quantity and quality of irrigation waters, transient flow in tile drainage systems, drain envelopes, sprinkler irrigation, trickle irrigation, crop production and water requirements, salt movement, regional groundwater modeling for optimizing sustainable yield, conveyance system modeling and control, and remote sensing.

Transportation Engineering

The graduate program in Transportation Engineering offers education and research opportunities in transportation systems planning, design, and management. It is designed to enable aspiring planners, engineers, and managers to obtain advanced degrees while specializing in infrastructure management, traffic network analysis, facility design, traffic operations, transportation economics and finance, and project appraisal. Up-to-date computer and laboratory facilities, as well as the Transportation Division's close links with local and state transportation agencies, enable students to gain hands-on experience and practical perspectives.

Past and present research undertaken by the Transportation Division faculty and researchers ranges from microscopic traffic flow simulation, dynamic route assignment, and network reliability to traffic accident modeling, pavement management, video image processing, and intelligent transportation systems. The focus remains on efficient and effective solutions to transportation problems.

Transportation Division course offerings expose students to the theoretical and practical aspects of goods and passenger transportation. State-of-the-art analytical tools and new research findings are introduced into the courses through periodic revision of notes, examples, problem sets, and computer software. Students are encouraged to design their own programs of study according to their personal and professional goals. Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of transportation, students are encouraged to include in their program of study course offerings from other programs in CEE, as well as from Mathematics and Statistics, Environment and Society, Applied Economics, Economics and Finance, Management, and Sociology.

Financial Assistance

Both departmental and formal grant support are available to graduate students and are awarded on a competitive basis. Students requesting financial support should apply to the department by March 15 for the coming academic year.

A number of fellowships are available through the University and the department. Teaching assistantships are available through the department and research assistantships are available through the Utah Water Research Laboratory and departmental faculty members who have ongoing projects or who hold special research grants from the University, private companies, or state and federal agencies.

Acceptance to pursue graduate studies in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department does not guarantee the student financial assistance. Inasmuch as funds are limited, the assistantships are awarded by the department to cover specific teaching assignments and by the faculty members to provide for research as funds are available.  

FACULTY - College of Engineering 
 

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