Jul 16, 2019  
2019-2020 General Catalog 
  
2019-2020 General Catalog

Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology


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Department Head: Derrik Tollefson
Location: Main 224
Phone: (435) 797-9296
FAX: (435) 797-1240
E-mail: annette.rindlisbacher@usu.edu
WWW: http://www.usu.edu/sswa/

Undergraduate Program Directors:
Sociology:

Christy Glass, Main 224F, (435) 797-1258, christy.glass@usu.edu
Peggy Petrzelka, Main 216E, (435) 797-0981, peggy.petrzelka@usu.edu

Social Work:
Terry L. Peak, Main 239D, (435) 797-4080, terry.peak@usu.edu

Anthropology:
Patricia Lambert, Main 245A, (435) 797-2603, patricia.lambert@usu.edu

Criminal Justice:
M.Scott Henrie, CBB-217, (435) 613-5135, scott.henrie@usu.edu; or
Richard Walton, CBB-217, (435) 613-5272, richard.walton@ceu.edu

Graduate Program Directors:
Sociology (MS, MSS, PhD) Director:

Dr. Richard Krannich, Main 216F, (435) 797-1241, richard.krannich@usu.edu

Social Work (MSW) Program Coordinator:
Derrik R. Tollefson, Main 239, (435) 797-1752, derrik.tollefson@usu.edu

Anthropology (MS) Director:
Steven Simms, Main 245G, (435) 797-1277, s.simms@usu.edu

Degrees offered: Bachelor of Science (BS), Bachelor of Arts (BA), Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Sociology; Academic Certificate (AC) in Criminal Justice; BS and BA in Social Work; Master of Social Work (MSW); BS, BA, and MS in Anthropology; participates in Master of Social Sciences (MSS)

Graduate Specializations: PhD in Sociology—Demography; Environment and Community; and States and Markets; MS in Anthropology—Archaeology and Cultural Resource Management

Full Details of the learning objectives, assessment plan, student outcomes, and evidence of continuous improvement for these programs of study can be found at sswa.usu.edu/assessment.

Undergraduate Programs

Objectives

The department offers educational programs for students to prepare for positions in business, social welfare, teaching, research, personnel, government service, social services, law enforcement, and industry, as well as providing liberal and general education for all interested students. The department offers a wide range of courses for the study of social, cultural, and behavioral dynamics. The department also provides University Studies, Liberal Arts, and other service courses for students from all majors.

Requirements

Departmental Admission Requirements

New freshmen admitted to USU in good standing qualify for admission to the sociology and anthropology majors, as well as to the pre-social work major. Undeclared and transfer students from other USU majors or other institutions must have a minimum 2.5 overall GPA.

For admission to the sociology major, students must additionally have earned a grade of C or better in SOC 1010  (effective Fall Semester 2005). For admission to the social work major, transfer students must have earned a minimum 2.75 GPA in all social work classes. Applicants to the social work major must have completed the basic social work core curriculum, must have a minimum 2.5 overall GPA and a minimum 2.75 GPA in social work classes, must have completed SW 1010  with a grade of C+ or better, and must have completed an application form (available from the department).

University Honors Program

The University Honors Program offers students in all colleges and majors the unique opportunity to deepen their educational experience with hands-on practical applications of their academic knowledge. The Honors Program admits incoming, transfer, and existing USU students based on application. High achieving students with at least one year remaining are encouraged to apply.  See the University Honors Program catalog entry and website (honors.usu.edu) for more information.

 

Additional Information

Major requirement sheets, which provide detailed information about requirements for majors and minors within the Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology Department, can be obtained from the department.

Sociology

Undergraduate Program Co-Directors: Christy Glass and Peggy Petrzelka
Program Office: Main 224, (435) 797-1230

The study of the human individual and human groups is central to sociology. Sociology offers a broad foundation for understanding human behavior on an individual and group basis, and encourages the development of skills necessary for establishing favorable societal conditions for human development.

Students learn to systematically describe and explain group behavior, including the effects of one group on another and of groups upon individual behavior. Required sociology classes deal with how people in different societies organize and control their societies; critical issues, such as race, class, and gender, as they have developed through history; and research and statistical methods for analyzing sociological data.

Upon completion of the prescribed program for a major in sociology, the student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge essential for understanding society from a sociological perspective;
  2. Identify and critically evaluate the contributions of sociologists, social scientists, and scholars;
  3. Identify and critically evaluate the forces and institutions that influence his or her life as a member of society;
  4. Identify, comprehend, and critically evaluate the influences of race, class, gender, age, and disability on a member of society;
  5. Pursue careers in sociological areas, business, government, and/or graduate study; and
  6. Apply the methods and concepts of sociology to the analysis of social issues, problems, and conflicts in preparation for participation as agents of creative social change.

Students select elective courses from three different areas: Crime and Deviance; Social Inequality; People, Place, and Change; and Social Health and Wellbeing. 

Career Opportunities

Surveys of graduates indicate that sociology majors pursue a wide range of occupations. About one-third are employed in the professional sector, while close to one-fourth are in service occupations. In addition, over 25 percent are involved in management or administration. In terms of specific job titles, social service is a popular option, as are retail sales and teaching. Other frequent job titles include vocational rehabilitation counselor, research analyst, data coordinator, management analyst, district sales manager, parole officer, juvenile probation officer, social services director, civil service test examiner, personnel director, insurance salesman, and correctional service officer. A variety of government and business positions are also expanding for sociology majors with the new emphasis on a liberal arts education. The growing awareness of the value of sociological perspectives for problem-solving continues to provide an increasing range of opportunities for employment in a variety of work settings.

Sample Four-year Plan for Sociology Major

A sample semester-by-semester four-year plan for students working toward a bachelor's degree is available in the Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology department.

Students should consult with their advisor to develop a plan of study tailored to their individual needs and interests.

Sociology and Social Work Dual Major

Sociology majors desiring additional preparation for employment in the social services may complete a dual major in sociology and social work. With the help of advisors, students who will seek positions in other special areas could include appropriately related courses.

Sociology BA/BS and Criminal Justice, AC

Students who have achieved the AC in Criminal Justice and who seek further understanding of the effects of social forces, systems, and related issues, may take a major in Sociology at USU's main campus. Students who do so are very strongly encouraged to seek assistance from professional advisors in choosing coursework and appropriate class prerequisites.

Teaching License

Sociology is defined as an approved teaching major in Utah secondary schools by the State Board of Education. The sociology major must complete a minor in a subject that is required in Utah high schools. In addition to completing the courses required for the sociology major, the sociology teaching minor must also complete the required teaching licensure courses in education. Students may select sociology as an approved teaching minor, for which the following courses are required: SOC 1010 , SOC 3010 , SOC 3110 , SOC 4010 , plus 6 elective credits in courses having a SOC prefix.

Gerontology Program

The Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology is one of several departments sponsoring an interdisciplinary gerontology program, which prepares students for careers in the field of aging. Students may earn a certificate in gerontology by completing a selected list of course requirements, including supervised field practicum in a gerontological setting.

More information concerning the gerontology certification program may be obtained from the Department of Family, Consumer, and Human Development .

American Studies Major

The Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology is one of several departments offering an area of concentration for the American Studies program. Students who wish to focus their work in American culture should refer to the American Studies, Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science  program descriptions.

Social Work

Program Director: Terry L. Peak
Program Office:  Main 239, (435) 797-1286; or Main 224, (435) 797-1230
 

Utah State University's Social Work Program offers a baccalaureate degree in social work. The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and meets requirements established by the State of Utah for licensure of social service workers. (A Master of Social Work program is also offered. Additional information is shown in the Social Work Graduate Program.)

The Social Work Program provides a learning environment for those who seek to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to bring about meaningful social change in individuals, groups, communities, organizations, and society. The program provides grounding in the fundamental generalist skills, knowledge, and values of social work, such as critical thinking, clarification of personal values, awareness of diversity, professional use of self, and communication and interpersonal relationship skills.

Social Work at Utah State University recognizes the historic importance of social welfare in balancing the country's economic and social structure. The program is committed to the resolution of contemporary human social problems, such as poverty, racism, discrimination, and economic injustice.

Program Goals

There are two fundamental goals that guide the Social Work Program:

  1. To prepare students for employment as generalist social workers through education in a professional foundation curriculum and selected liberal arts education coursework.
  2. To prepare students for advanced education, as well as responsible citizenship in the areas of service and research.

The program is based on a generalist conception of social work and a problem-solving, empowerment, and strengths model of practice. The social work sequence stresses problem solving at the interface of person and environment, which requires that students develop a repertoire of generalist practice skills. The program inculcates in students the knowledge, skills, understanding, and values necessary to perform multi-level assessments and interventions utilizing a theoretical knowledge base. The program is committed to building a student's education on a solid base that includes a liberal arts perspective vital to the development of a social worker.

The program prepares students for advanced standing in graduate professional programs and to provide a solid academic base for continuing education. To accomplish this, the program facilitates the development of the profession's knowledge, values, and skills; provides a well-rounded liberal arts educational foundation; and teaches good study habits, written and oral communication skills, and the ability to think critically.

The program endeavors to maintain a campus environment that fosters a sense of community and social responsibility. To accomplish this, the program provides opportunities for service learning, social development, and research, in part through the state-affiliated National Association of Social Workers student organization and the Social Work Phi Alpha Honor Society.

Code of Conduct

During academic and field training, students are required to abide by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and standards of conduct specified by the (NASW) and the Utah State Board of Social Work Examiners. Failure to do so may result in dismissal from the Social Work Program. A more complete discussion of Social Work Program policies can be accessed at: http://socialwork.usu.edu/

Licensure

In the State of Utah, graduates with a bachelor's degree in Social Work are eligible to be licensed as social service workers upon graduation. Students may obtain further information on licensure from:

Department of Commerce
Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing
160 East 300 South
PO Box 146741
Salt Lake City UT 84114-6741
Tel. (801) 530-6628
Fax (801) 530-6511
http://www.dopl.utah.gov

Liberal Arts Foundation

All students pursuing an undergraduate degree at Utah State University must meet requirements designed to assure a broad, liberal arts foundation. Cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary perspectives are vital to a student's development as a social worker. The University Studies program, which is described in detail in this catalog (University Studies Depth Requirements ), is required of all majors. Students are expected to take STAT 1040 - Introduction to Statistics (QL) , to fulfill the quantitative literacy requirement for University Studies. In addition to fulfilling University Studies requirements, majors will need to complete specific liberal arts courses, listed in the Social Work Program requirements, some of which fulfill both University Studies and Social Work Program requirements. Social Work majors must complete STAT 1040 - Introduction to Statistics (QL)  and SOC 3120 - Social Statistics I (QI)  to graduate.

Program Admission Requirements

The following regulations apply for admission to the Social Work Program: (1) New freshmen admitted to USU in good standing qualify for admission to the Social Work Major. (2) Transfer students from other institutions must obtain a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum overall GPA of 2.75 in social work classes. (Refer to the USU Social Work Program Transfer of Credit Policy.) (3) Students transferring from other USU majors must complete the Social Work Major course of study and must obtain a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum overall GPA of 2.75 in social work classes. (4) Students must apply for and meet criteria for advanced standing, in order to continue on in upper-division social work practice and field practicum courses. (5) Students are responsible for reviewing and knowing the requirements for the Social Work degree. (6) All courses required for the Social Work degree must be taken for a letter grade. (7) The Social Work Program does not grant social work course credit for life experience or work experience.

Sample Four-year Plan for Social Work Major

A sample semester-by-semester four-year plan for students working toward a bachelor's degree in Social Work can be found in the department.

Students should consult with their advisor or social work program peer advisor to develop a plan of study tailored to their individual needs and interests.

Procedures for Advanced Standing in the Social Work Major

In order to be considered for advanced standing, students must complete all required coursework and turn in a completed application form by March 1 of the academic year. Applications for admission to advanced standing can be obtained in the Social Work Office, Main 239, or at www.socialwork.usu.edu.  At the end of the spring semester, when the criteria for advanced standing have been met, eligible students will be ranked according to their grade point average, personal statement essay, performance on the advanced placement test, and faculty evaluation. The highest ranking students will receive advanced standing, which will allow them to enroll in upper-division practice courses. Only those students who have completed first- and second-year requirements by the end of spring semester of the application year will be considered for advanced standing. The advanced standing admission process allows the social work program to: (1) maintain a high-quality educational experience for students in upper-division practice courses, and (2) maintain the status of full accreditation by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). Students will receive notification of acceptance in June of the application year. Students who do not receive advanced standing are not allowed to enroll in upper-division practice courses; they may work to improve their application status by retaking courses to improve their GPA or address any other deficiency and reapply for advanced standing during the following year.

Leave of Absence

After admission to Advanced Standing, students may request a leave of absence from the Social Work program. They must contact the program and reapply in March of the year preceding the requested reinstatement.

To be considered for advanced standing, students must meet the following minimum criteria:

  1. Completion of the following courses with a C or better:
  1. Completion of SW 1010  (Introduction to Social Welfare) with a grade of C+ or better.
  2. Junior status (61-90 credits) upon application.
  3. Maintenance of a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in social work classes.
  4. No Pass-D-Fail grades in courses required for the major.

Students applying for advanced standing will be evaluated on the following criteria:

  1. Social Work GPA of 2.75 or higher and minimum overall GPA of 2.5.
  2. Personal statement/self-assessment essay that addresses the student's commitment to and enthusiasm for extracurricular and volunteer activities, career goals, interests, aspirations, and congruence with the NASW values and purposes.
  3. Quality of written material.
  4. A satisfactory score (70 percent or higher) on the Advanced Placement Test (APT).
  5. Faculty evaluation, as indicated by participation, class attendance, and use of self in the classroom and in program associated activities.

Students should also be aware that if there are any personal data, such as that included on the application for state licensure, which might indicate a potential threat to the public safety and welfare, that student may be denied advanced standing in the program. Students turned down for advanced standing will be assisted in finding a more suitable major or may reapply during the following year.

To maintain advanced standing and eligibility for graduation as a Social Work Major, a student: (1) must obtain a B- or better in SW 3050 , SW 4150 , and SW 4160 ; (2) must have completed SW 1010   with a C+ or better; (3) must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 or better and a minimum 2.75 GPA in the Social Work Major; (4) must receive a grade of C or better in all other courses required for the major; (5) must not repeat more than once, to improve a grade, any course required for the major; and (6) must not receive a Pass-D-Fail grade for any course required for the major.

Procedures for Admission to Field Practicum

Students must complete 480 clock hours of supervised field practicum and integrative seminar coursework. The field practicum courses are SW 4870   and SW 5870 . Application to the field practicum must be made during the spring semester of the academic year prior to enrollment in the practicum, and is due by mid-February; students may not enroll in SW 4870  until they have been officially accepted to the practicum. Applications are available in Main 239. No applications for the practicum will be accepted from students who will not complete all required coursework by the end of spring semester.

The following are eligibility criteria for admission to the field practicum:

  1. Senior status (92-120 credits completed) by the end of the spring semester in which the student applies. Only those students who are candidates for the baccalaureate degree in social work may be admitted to the field practicum.
  2. Completion of University Studies program (including Depth Education requirements) and all social work courses, with the exception of SW 5350  
  3. A grade of B- or better in SW 3050  (Practice I), SW 4150  (Practice II), and SW 4160  (Practice III).
  4. A grade of C or better in all courses required for the major and a grade of C+ or better in SW 1010  (Introduction to Social Welfare).
  5. No Pass-D-Fail grades received in courses required for the major.
  6. Demonstration of appropriate professional, moral, and ethical character, and must abide by the (NASW) Code of Ethics.
  7. Maintenance of an overall minimum GPA of 2.5 and a 2.75 minimum GPA in the Social Work Major.
  8. A satisfactory score (70 percent or higher) on the Generalist Practice Test (GPT).

Students should also be aware that if there are any personal data, such as that included on the application for state licensure, which indicate a potential threat to the public safety and welfare, that student may be denied continuation in the program. If a student is denied admission to the practicum, that student may request a review of his/her file.

Students entering the practicum cannot ordinarily begin their placement earlier than the start of fall semester. If they do so, this practice falls outside of the Social Work Program's responsibility, and any accrued hours will not count toward the required practicum hours.

Transfer of Credit Policy

Students who transfer to the USU Social Work Program are required to complete an application for transfer credit. Students may substitute certain social work classes taken at other (CSWE) accredited programs for USU courses. Course approval must be approved by the student's advisor. When petitioning for a substitution, the student is responsible to meet with an advisor and fill out a transfer of credit form, available in Main 239. Social work courses taken ten or more years ago cannot ordinarily serve as substitutes for required courses.  Courses taken in a department or program not accredited by the CSWE cannot ordinarily serve as substitutes for the USU Social Work courses unless they have been covered in an articulation agreement.

The following regulations apply to transfer students: (1) A transfer credit application, with official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, must be submitted. (2) The transcripts must reflect an overall grade point average of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) and a 2.75 GPA in all social work courses. (3) The credentials of students seeking transfer to the Utah State University Social Work Program will be evaluated on an individual basis. (4) University Studies Depth Education requirements must be completed by all students, including transfer students who have earned an associate's degree.

The following courses, or their equivalents, will be considered for transfer credit:

Students transferring from junior colleges will be required to apply for advanced standing and take upper-division social work courses at USU. Only those social work courses taken within the last ten years will be considered. Students transferring credits from CSWE accredited programs must apply for advanced standing, arrange to take the Advanced Placement Test (APT) during the spring semester before they arrive on campus, and take the following courses with the USU Social Work Program:

Social Work faculty members review applications for advanced standing to qualify students to enroll in upper-division practice classes. Advanced standing is based on the following criteria: (1) completion of ANTH 1010  (BSS); BIOL 1010  (BLS); ENGL 1010  (CL1), ENGL 2010  (CL2); HDFS 1500  (BSS); PSY 1010  (BSS); SOC 1010  (BSS); and SW 2100 , SW 2400  with a grade of C or better; (2) completion of SW 1010  with a grade of C+ or better; (3) junior status (61-90 credits); (4) maintenance of a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in social work classes; (5) a passing score on the Advanced Placement Test (APT), which is a score of 70 percent or higher; and (6) no Pass-D-Fail grades received in courses required for the major. Students transferring to USU should obtain and complete a copy of the social work advanced standing application and send the application to the Social Work Program by March 1, prior to the fall semester in which they intend to transfer.

Students transferring to USU should be advised that social work education is a professional program designed to prepare competent and effective social work professionals. Coursework is based upon a specific body of knowledge, values, and professional skills. Therefore, if students have not completed the required criteria for advanced standing, completion of their educational program could take additional time. For more information about the Social Work Program, call (435) 797-1286, or visit the Social Work website at: socialwork.usu.edu/

Social Work Student Organizations

The Social Work Program recognizes the importance of students having opportunities to learn and socialize outside of the classroom. Students are encouraged to become involved with the NASW student organization, as well as the USU Social Work Program Theta Gamma chapter of the Phi Alpha Honor Society. Information about these organizations is available in Main 239 or at http://socialwork.usu.edu/

Social Work Program Outcomes

Social Work Program outcomes are available for review at: http://socialwork.usu.edu/

Anthropology

Program Director: TBD
Program Office:  Main 245A, (435) 797-0219; or Main 224, (435) 797-1230

 

Anthropology is the integrated study of humans in all their aspects. It offers a broad framework for understanding humans as individuals and as members of widely varying societies through courses dealing with the biological evolution of humans, prehistoric culture change, and present diversity of cultures and human populations. Two parallel goals of the discipline are to explore and develop an appreciation for human diversity and the shared legacy of our common humanity.

Anthropology includes the following subspecialties: cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and applied anthropology which can cross-cut the other subspecialties. Major requirements are designed both to encourage broad exploration across anthropology and more in-depth learning of one subspecialty. Students who major in anthropology examine a wide range of peoples and cultures, both past and present. They study lifeways as different as the hunter-gatherers of Ice-Age North America, tribal horticulturalists of lush interior Amazonia, and the diverse ethnic neighborhoods of modern U.S. cities. They explore both the biological and cultural basis of human behavior, and examine how it is manifested in individuals and groups. Anthropology courses use both scientific and humanistic approaches to the study of humankind, in all its complexity. Courses emphasize critical reasoning, oral and written communication skills, global literacy and the expansion of thinking beyond the familiar.

The contemporary social science student lives in a world of diminishing cultural and national barriers. In this setting, a major in anthropology can lead to a wide variety of careers. Anthropologists are on the staff of leading medical, business, law, public affairs, and other professional schools, and have played critical roles in international ventures, public health programs, community development activities, and minority and migrant social actions. Additionally, anthropology serves applied interests in international development, archaeology and cultural resource management, cross-cultural health care, and osteology/ forensics. With first-hand experience in every region of the country and around the world, anthropologists bring a unique understanding of specific social and ethnic groups and of the biological, ecological, and cultural factors that influence human behavior.

Special features of the anthropology program include smaller classes, individualized attention, opportunities for laboratory, museum, and field work, and the opportunity of working in teaching assistant positions. All these features give anthropology majors choices and experiences unavailable to undergraduates in most programs. The Anthropology Museum and Field Schools provide additional hands-on learning opportunities. Anthropology participates in the Department of Geology emphasis in Geoarchaeology, the American Studies Program, and the Folklore Program in the Department of English. The Anthropology Program also hosts USU's Museum Studies CHaSS Area Studies Certification Program, which can be pursued by students with any background and major, and at the undergraduate or graduate level anthromuseum.usu.edu/museumstudies.aspx.

Anthropology leads to a variety of "real-world" jobs. Anthropology graduates are: lawyers, nurses, health care administrators, travel consultants, teachers of all kinds, cultural resource professionals, agency and program administrators, and technical writers. They work for museums, government land management, environmental and Foreign Service agencies, Indian tribes, and are common in both the government and private sectors of the environmental-cultural heritage management industry. They can be found in public and private foundations, bureaus, and agencies for the arts, humanities, sciences, and tourism.

Graduate study in anthropology opens the world of practicing anthropology. Not limited to college teaching, anthropologists with graduate degrees can be found in a variety of private sector and government agency positions in jobs that often weather economic downturns better than those in  many others sectors.

For students seeking a dual major, an Anthropology major can complement a major in American Studies, Biology, Geology, Geography, History, Languages, Political Science and various others.  It also pairs well with majors in Natural Resources, because cultural resource and Native American issues are important to many positions in private firms and government agencies concerned with land management and the environment. 

Sample Four-year Plan for Anthropology Major

A sample semester-by-semester four-year plan for students working toward a bachelor's degree in Anthropology can be found in the department.

Students should consult with both their major advisor and their HASS advisor to develop a plan of study tailored to their individual needs and interests.

Associate of Criminal Justice Program

This is a two-year, academic program, currently offered only through USU-Eastern or via the RCDE Broadcast system.

        M. Scott Henrie, PR 101B,(435) 613-5135, scott.henrie@usu.edu; or

        Richard Walton, PR 101A, (435) 613-5272, richard.walton@usu.edu

The Criminal Justice Program is an Associate Degree offered by USU-Eastern or via the RCDE system.  Associate degrees are designed to meet the qualifications of the first two years of a Baccalaureate Degree. A student who transfers from USU-Eastern to a public four year institution of higher education in the State of Utah will be automatically cleared of all general education requirements if he or she has received an Associate Degree (students receiving the Associate of Pre-Engineering may have to take additional general education credits). Most accredited four year institutions of higher education in the United States will accept the Associate degree. Students are advised to examine the catalog of the institution to which they plan to transfer.


Credit for courses numbered 1000 or above earned at USU-Eastern are transferable within the Utah State System of Higher Education and will be carried on the student's transcript by the receiving institution. Acceptance of credit should not be confused with its application toward a specific set of requirements or major. Credit other than that intended wholly to meet the General Education requirements of the receiving institution will be applied on the basis of the appropriateness of credit to a particular institution's specific degree program requirements, as determined by the receiving institution.

Students must complete the General Education Requirements:

  • Three credits from each of the following: Humanities, Fine Arts and Humanities or Fine Arts

Students must also complete the University Studies Depth Requirements:

  • Three credits from each of the following: Earth Science, Life Science and Phyiscal Science

 

  • Students planning to transfer to the BA or BS program in Sociology or Social Work at the USU main campus are advised to take STAT 1040  to fulfill the Quantitative Literacy Requirement.

 

Sociology Graduate Program

Graduate Program Director: Richard Krannich
Program Office: Main 216F, (435) 797-1241

The Sociology Graduate Program offers graduate work leading to the MS and PhD degrees in Sociology. The Sociology Program also administers an interdisciplinary Master of Social Sciences (MSS) degree.

The department offers a general MS degree in Sociology and supports training in three official specializations: Demography; Environment and Community; and States and Markets.  Masters and doctoral students take core theory and methods classes and multiple seminars in substantive areas of sociology as part of their training.  Sociology PhD students are required to pass a single written comprehensive examination in one of the supported specialization areas, and to complete depth coursework in a second specialization area.  Both MS and PhD students must conduct original research and write and defend a thesis or dissertation to complete their degrees.

The Graduate Program in Sociology provides a unique integrative and reinforcing combination of demographic, organizational, political-economic, and social psychological orientations to the study major domestic and global issues. Graduate students have the opportunity to merge basic foundation coursework in social theory and research methods with more specialized training in selected specialty areas. There are ample opportunities for apprenticeship and mentoring experiences on both basic and applied research projects. Sustained personal interaction between faculty and students is a hallmark and strength of the program. 

The Graduate Program in Sociology has developed a Graduate Program Handbook that provides more details about the application process, financial assistance decisions, and graduation requirements. An electronic copy of this handbook is available on the departmental website: sociology.usu.edu/socgrad.aspx

The typical graduate application has five main components:

  1. A formal on-line application form, available from the School of Graduate Studies;
  2. Transcripts from the applicant's undergraduate and graduate studies;
  3. Test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for all applicants, and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examinations for international students whose native language is not English. USU policy is that students must have scores on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) at or above the 40th percentile. Minimum score requirements for the TOEFL are a score of 213 or higher on the computer-based TOEFL, or 79 or higher on the internet based test. For the IELTS, USU requires a minimum score of 6.0. To be competitive, the Sociology Graduate Program expects GRE scores above the USU minimum. TOEFL scores of 600 (paper), 250 (computer-based), or 100 (internet) and IELTS scores of 7 or higher.
  4. Letters of reference from faculty or scholars who can attest to the applicant's abilities to succeed in graduate school; and
  5. Submission of a separate letter of intent providing detailed information about the applicant's training, interests, and experiences, as well as an overview of the applicant's career goals and specific reasons why graduate training in sociology at Utah State University is important to the applicant.

The letter of intent can be submitted directly to the Sociology Director of Graduate Studies at Utah State University, 0730 Old Main Hill, Logan UT 84322-0730.

The department offers financial assistance to most graduate students enrolled in departmental programs. These funds are distributed through a competitive process, based on student qualifications, performance, and interests. Graduate assistants typically earn enough to cover basic costs of tuition and living expenses. In order to be considered for financial assistance for the following academic year, complete applications must be received by USU no later than February 1. Decisions on graduate student funding are usually based on an overall evaluation of all five components of the application.

TOEFL scores are required for international candidates, with a minimum score of 600 (paper test), 250 (computer-based test) or 100 (internet test) deemed acceptable. The Test of Spoken English (TSE) is also strongly recommended, with a minimum score of 50 deemed acceptable. International applicants who are admitted without having taken the TSE will be required to take a test of spoken English fluency administered by the Intensive English Language Institute (IELI) at Utah State University prior to beginning their first semester in the Sociology Graduate Program. Dependent upon the test results, the student may be required to complete a program of English language training during the first semester of residence in the graduate program. For consideration for admission to the MSS degree program, applicants may submit either GRE or Miller Analogies Test scores.

Applications are screened throughout the year by the Graduate Program Executive Committee. No applications will be considered until all required information arrives in the School of Graduate Studies or a formal petition to review a nearly-complete file is made and approved.

Students with or without an undergraduate degree in sociology may enter the master's degree program. However, before matriculating, basic competencies in sociology that have not been acquired through prior courses or experience must be satisfied. Students entering the doctoral program must complete master's level prerequisites in sociological theory and research methods and statistics.

MSS Sociology Specialization

The Sociology program also supports the interdisciplinary MSS degree. The focus of the MSS degree through Sociology has traditionally emphasized aspects of International Rural and Community Development. The MSS degree offers multidisciplinary graduate training for candidates desiring in-depth applied understanding of human performance, human environments, and/or the structuring of social, political, and economic systems. The MSS specialization in sociology requires a minimum of 35 credits, including 17 credits of graduate sociology courses and either (1) a minimum of 9 credits in each of two secondary disciplines, or (2) a minimum of 9 credits in one secondary discipline and 9 credits in an approved cluster. Students must complete an approved Plan B paper (for 2 credits) as part of their sociology coursework. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 is required.  This is an applied degree. Individual options and plans of study can be arranged in consultation with the student's supervisory committee. Contact the Sociology Graduate Program Director for more information.

Research

The graduate program's research agenda is focused within the framework of the department's specialty areas. Since the areas are integrative, research tends to involve collaborative participation by several faculty members. Several active research projects are supported by the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. Research is conducted at various levels, including international, national, regional, and state. The department has two active research units: (1) the Institute for Social Science Research on Natural Resources and (2) the Population Research Laboratory. Departmental research is supported by grants from federal and state agencies, local governments, private foundations, and the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. Faculty members participate in many cross-campus research efforts, including the Center for Women and Gender, the USU Water Initiative, the Utah Water Research Laboratory, the Mountain West Center for Regional Studies, and the Ecology Center.

Financial Assistance

Both departmental support and formal research grant support are available to graduate students and are awarded on a competitive basis. Some highly qualified departmental graduate students are also nominated to compete for University fellowships. Students who wish to be considered for financial aid must submit applications by February 1 for the coming academic year. Late applications are considered only if additional funds are still available.

Teaching assistantships are available through the department. Research assistantships are available through faculty members who have ongoing projects with the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station or who have research grants from the University, private companies, and federal or state agencies. University fellowships are available for exceptionally qualified students.

Career Opportunities

Traditionally, persons with advanced degrees in sociology have been employed in college and university settings. Recent evidence has shown a greater variety of career paths. A survey conducted by the American Sociological Association showed that 21 percent of sociologists holding the doctoral degree were employed in the private sector; 31 percent were working in the nonprofit sector; 46 percent were working in federal, state, or local government agencies; and 12 percent were self-employed. USU sociology graduates have followed this pattern of diversity. They have secured appointments in a variety of academic, governmental, and private settings, both domestic and abroad. A sizeable number have achieved key leadership positions and high visibility in the profession.

Social Work Graduate Program

Graduate (MSW) Program Coordinator: Derrik R. Tollefson
Program Office: Main 239, (435) 797-1286

The Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology offers graduate work leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW) degree. The MSW Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The program can be completed in three formats, a 2-year full-time program, a 3-year part-time program and a 1-year advanced standing program, which is only available to students with undergraduate degrees in social work from an accredited program. The mission of the MSW program is to serve the public by preparing graduates as professionals in advanced generalist practice and by equipping them with the skills necessary for leadership roles within the social work profession. The MSW program emphasizes the advanced generalist practice knowledge and skills essential to the tasks of promoting social welfare, especially among vulnerable populations, in institutions such as government, education, health, employment, housing, and criminal justice. The program is dedicated to the development of professional social workers who understand the need to advocate for vulnerable populations, and to work toward the establishment of societies free from poverty, violence, oppression, and discrimination. Specifically, the MSW program prepares graduates to:

  1. Understand the values, concepts, and skills that constitute the framework of generalist and advanced generalist practice.
  2. Apply the knowledge and skills of a generalist and advanced generalist social work perspective to practice with systems of all sizes.
  3. Understand biopsychosocial theory and the person-inenvironment perspective as viewed within the context of agency practice, and as they relate to legislative and policy issues.
  4. Utilize evaluative methods in practice.
  5. Practice with cultural competence.
  6. Utilize advocacy and administrative skills as a means to promote social change in communities and organizations.

The Graduate Program in Social Work MSW Program Handbook provides more details about the application process, financial assistance decisions, and graduation requirements. An electronic copy of this handbook is available at: socialwork.usu.edu.

Application Requirements

The MSW application has six main components:

  1. A formal application form, available from the School of Graduate Studies;
  2. Transcripts from the applicant's undergraduate and graduate studies;
  3. Letters of reference from faculty members or scholars who can attest to the applicant's abilities to succeed in graduate school;
  4. A written personal statement;
  5. A resume; and
  6. Passing scores from one or more of the following examinations (contact the MSW program coordinator for details):
    1. Graduate Record Examination (GRE); or
    2. Miller's Analogies Test; and
    3. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Spoken English (TSE) examinations for international students whose native language is not English.

All applicants must have successfully completed a research methods or statistics course, as well as at least one introductory social or behavioral science course prior to enrolling in the program. TOEFL scores are required for international candidates, with a minimum score of 600 (paper test) or 250 (computer-based test) deemed acceptable. The TSE examination is also strongly recommended, with a minimum score of 50 deemed acceptable.  International applicants who are admitted without having taken the TSE will be required to take a test of spoken English fluency administered by the Intensive English Language Institute (IELI) at Utah State University prior to beginning their first semester in the MSW Program. Dependent upon the test results, the student may be required to complete a program of English language training during the first semester of residence in the MSW program.

Applications are screened by the MSW Admissions Committee beginning February 1 of the year before which a new cohort will be admitted. Full-time and part-time cohorts are admitted every two and three years, respectively. To determine when the next full-time and part-time cohorts will be admitted, contact the MSW program coordinator. No application will be considered until all required information arrives in the School of Graduate Studies or until a formal petition to review a nearly complete file is made and approved. Students with an undergraduate degree in social work from a CSWE-accredited program may be permitted to substitute elective courses for select foundation year courses, provided they obtained their undergraduate degree within five years of enrolling in the MSW program.

All application materials should be sent directly to: School of Graduate Studies, 0900 Old Main Hill, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322-0900.

Financial Assistance

Some financial assistance is available. These funds are distributed through a competitive process, based on student qualifications, performance, and interests. In order to be considered for financial assistance for the next academic year, complete applications must be received no later than February 1. Decisions on graduate student funding are usually based on an overall evaluation of all six components of the application.

Career Opportunities

There are many career opportunities for social workers, particularly for those with a Master of Social Work degree. MSW graduates practice in a wide variety of public and private agency settings, such as child welfare, youth services, mental health/counseling, schools, criminal justice, and medical settings such as hospitals and long-term care facilities, to name just a few. Social workers interact with diverse client populations and seek to improve quality of life, particularly for those who exist on the margins of society. Career opportunities are abundant as the job market for professional social workers is expanding, both locally and nationally.

An MSW degree can also unlock the door to upward career mobility. In the human services field, the MSW degree is more and more frequently required for supervisory or management-level positions. The MSW degree also brings higher salaries, as well as qualifying the graduate to pursue licensure as a Certified Social Worker (CSW) and/or a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW).

Anthropology Graduate Program

Graduate Program Director: Steve Simms
Program Office: Main 245G, (435) 797-1277

The Department of Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree in Anthropology with a Specialization in Archaeology and Cultural Resource Management.

Cultural Resource Management (CRM) archaeology provides industry and government agencies with an evaluation of heritage resources that by law must be "taken into account" prior to the alteration of our public landscapes. CRM is now an institutionalized element of the environmental management industry in the United States and in many other countries. Archaeologists identify and record all prehistoric and historic cultural resources, from ancient villages and camps, to pioneer cabins, 19th century gold mines, and human skeletons. Archaeologists help industry and agencies to find ways to protect what is of value by avoidance and occasionally by mitigation, and they facilitate land management. Federal and state laws and regulations govern the practice of archaeology by issuing permits, and a national Register of Professional Archaeologists certifies professional standards. The minimum degree requirement for the permits and the professional registry is a master's degree.

Senior archaeologists working in CRM realize the need for graduate training to be more than applied archaeology. In order to produce career-path archaeologists, graduate training needs to include adequate knowledge of the scientific research contexts of archaeology, as well as experience in the conduct of research, to prepare students for careers, and not just as technicians in a transient labor force. The graduate program in Anthropology at Utah State University responds to the changing needs of archaeology and to recommendations of archaeologists in the CRM industry. The master's degree will also prepare students intending to pursue a PhD degree at another institution.

Following the recommendations of the 2006 SAA forum on graduate training in CRM, the program has been designed around the following performance goals:

  1. The curricula should recognize the much broader scope of CRM and should incorporate business, ecology, and the legal/regulatory environment in which CRM archaeology exists.
  2. Written and verbal communication skills should be gained.
  3. Students should gain experience in the preparation of proposals and research design.
  4. Basic applied field techniques, including survey, mapping, GPS, and sampling, should be taught.
  5. Students should master basic applied techniques in data analysis, collections processing, and collections management.
  6. Experience should be given in report preparation.
  7. The graduate curricula should provide structured mentorships or internships with CRM companies and/or government agencies.

The Graduate Program in Anthropology has developed an MS Anthropology Program Handbook providing more details about the application process, financial assistance decisions, and graduation requirements.

Further information about Graduate Studies in Anthropology at USU can be found at: http://www.usu.edu/anthro/mastersprogram.htm

Application Requirements

The MS Program in Anthropology application has six main components:

  1. A formal application form, available online at: http://www.usu.edu/graduateschool/
  2. Transcripts from the applicant's undergraduate and graduate studies
  3. Letters of reference from faculty or scholars who can attest to the applicant's abilities to succeed in graduate school
  4. A resume
  5. A letter of intent providing background about the applicant's training, interests, and experiences, as well as an overview of the applicant's career goals and specific reasons why graduate training in archaeology and cultural resource management is important to the applicant
  6. Test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for all applicants, and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Spoken English (TSE) examinations for international students whose native language is not English

TOEFL scores are required for international candidates, with a minimum score of 600 (paper test) or 250 (computer-based test) deemed acceptable. The TSE examination is also strongly recommended, with a minimum score of 50 deemed acceptable. International applicants who are admitted without having taken the TSE will be required to take a test of spoken English fluency administered by the Intensive English Language Institute (IELI) at Utah State University prior to beginning their first semester in the MS program. Dependent upon the test results, the student may be required to complete a program of English language training during the first semester of residence in the MS Degree Program in Anthropology.

Students requesting financial support, including continuing students, should apply no later than March 15. Applications to the program will be accepted through June 15. No application will be considered until all required information arrives in the School of Graduate Studies or until a formal petition to review a nearly complete file is made and approved.

All application materials should be sent directly to the School of Graduate Studies, 0900 Old Main Hill, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322-0900.

Financial Assistance

Some financial assistance is available, primarily in the form of graduate assistantships. These funds are distributed through a competitive process, based on student qualifications, performance, and interests. The program sometimes offers scholarships to exceptional incoming and continuing students, and all students are strongly encouraged to fill out a FAFSA form and to explicitly request, among other forms of aid, a work-study award. In order to be considered for financial assistance for the next academic year, complete applications must be received no later than March 15. Decisions on graduate student funding are usually based on an overall evaluation of all six components of the application.

The Anthropology Program launched a spin-off Cultural Resources Management company called USUAS, Inc. in summer 2009. The firm often employs students for a short-term and summer jobs, offers internship opportunities and is a rich source of field and laboratory projects for master's theses. For more information, visit usuas.com.

Career Opportunities

Nationwide the CRM industry is valued at several billion dollars per year. By the late 1990s, "60-70 percent of the membership of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA), and the Society for Historical Archaeology are engaged in cultural resources management." (SAA Bulletin 1997:20). An inventory of job listings on the SAA website during summer 2007 reveals that 82 percent of the advertised positions are in private or government sector CRM. In Utah there are more than 50 private companies holding archaeological permits, with 18 firms maintaining offices in the state. The Utah Division of State History reports that more than 1,700 archaeological field projects are conducted in the state each year. CRM is a thriving industry looking for qualified individuals, and the MS program in Anthropology at USU is specifically designed to provide the training and degree qualifications sought after by employers in both the public and private sectors.

FACULTY - College of Humanities and Social Sciences   
 

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