Jul 15, 2020  
2011-2012 General Catalog 
    
2011-2012 General Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG Please see current catalog at https://catalog.usu.edu/]

Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication


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Department Head: Bradford ‘J’ Hall
Location: Main 204
Phone: (435) 797-1209
FAX: (435) 797-1329
E-mail: lpsc@usu.edu
WWW: http://lpsc.usu.edu

Associate Department Head: Cacilda Rego
Location: Main 202 F
Phone: (435) 797-7102
FAX: (435) 797-1329
E-mail: cacilda.rego@usu.edu

Department Section Coordinators:

Chinese:

Ko-Yin Sung, Main 002C, (435) 797-9182, koyin.sung@usu.edu

French:

Sarah Gordon, Main 002L, (435) 797-8213, sarah.gordon@usu.edu

German:

Doris McGonagill, Main 002E, (435) 797-9182, doris.mcgonagill@usu.edu

Japanese:

Atsuko O. Neely, Main 306, (435) 797-1365, atsuko.neely@usu.edu

Master of Second Language Teaching (MSLT):

Co-Directors:

Karin de Jonge-Kannan, Main 002D, (435) 797-8318, karin.dejongekan@usu.edu

Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante, Main 209, (435) 797-0788, maria.spicer@usu.edu

Philosophy:

Charlie Huenemann, Main 208, (435) 797-0254, charlie.huenemann@usu.edu

Portuguese:

Cacilda Rego, Main 002E, (435) 797-7102, cacilda.rego@usu.ed

Spanish:

Maria Cordero, Main 210, (435) 797-1423, maria.cordero@usu.edu

David Richter, Main 202H, (435) 797-9167, david.richter@usu.edu

Speech:

John S. Seiter, Main 308, (435) 797-0138, john.seiter@usu.edu

Degrees offered: Bachelor of Arts (BA) in French, German, Spanish and Asian Studies; BA and Bachelor of Science (BS) in Philosophy; BA and BS in Speech; Master of Second Language Teaching (MSLT)

Undergraduate Programs

Mission Statement

The Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication offers programs in modern languages and literature, philosophy, and speech communication. While these programs differ widely in their curricula, they are bound together by two considerations: (1) an emphasis on humanistic content and method of inquiry; and (2) a recognition on the part of the departmental faculty that a critical part of becoming an educated person lies in achieving a greater understanding of one’s self and of others, an understanding opened up through insight into the spoken and written word.

Courses offered by the department provide majors and minors with opportunities to achieve this understanding by increasing their communicative, logical, interpretive, linguistic and research skills; their ability to function within an increasingly globalized society; and their awareness of ethical, aesthetic, and other values. Courses offered by the department also give students in the teaching emphasis and teaching minors the opportunity to serve the needs of the education professions.

Through its participation in the University Studies program, the department provides all students with an opportunity to gain knowledge  of how people come to understand themselves through their cultural, literary, and philosophical achievements. The department also furthers the education of both traditional and nontraditional students through faculty participation in interdisciplinary programs such as Honors, Latin American Studies, Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Liberal Arts, Asian Studies, and Women and Gender Studies; and in cooperative education, distance learning, extension, and study-abroad programs.

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements  for freshmen desiring entrance to major programs offered by the Department of Languages, Philosophy, and Speech Communication are the same as those for Utah State University. Transfer students from other institutions and from other majors within Utah State University must have an overall minimum GPA of 2.5 (2.75 for Spanish) to be admitted to the department’s major programs.

For admission to the speech major, students must submit an application and meet the following prerequisites:

  1. Students must have earned at least 25 semester credits at USU or at another college or university.
  2. A cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher must have been attained.
  3. Either SPCH 1020  or SPCH 2110  (or an equivalent course) must have been completed with a grade of C+ or better.

Admission is limited to 25 students each year. Decisions will be based on: (1) academic record, (2) realistic career or professional study objective, (3) ability of this program to prepare the student for his or her intended career, (4) satisfactory speaking and writing competencies, and (5) motivation and creativity demonstrated by class performance, work experience, volunteer activities, and other means provided by the student during the application process.

All students majoring in programs offered by this department must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 in their major (3.0 in Spanish) to be in good standing in the department and to obtain official approval for graduation.

Career Information

For career and graduate school information, students should contact undergraduate advisors in the department.

Scholarship Information

Six scholarships are offered through the Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication. The Brett Blanch Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an outstanding philosophy major. The Carl T. Degener Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an outstanding language major at the junior level. The Gene W. and Ruth Miller Family Scholarship is for an academic major in languages. Outstanding upper-division students in French (and under some circumstances Spanish) are eligible for the Jean Inness Scholarship. The Thain Scholarship is awarded to an outstanding high school senior enrolling in a language or philosophy course at USU. The Harold J. Kinzer Scholarship is awarded to a speech major who has earned a minimum of 9 upper-division USU credits toward the major or who is currently enrolled at USU. The Jaime Cantarovici Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an outstanding undergraduate senior majoring in Spanish. For further details about available scholarships, contact the departmental office.

Departmental Honors

Students who would like to experience greater academic depth within their major are encouraged to enroll in departmental honors. Through original, independent work, Honors students enjoy the benefits of close supervision and mentoring, as they work one-on-one with faculty in select upper-division departmental courses. Honors students also complete a senior project, which provides another opportunity to collaborate with faculty on a problem that is significant, both personally and in the student’s discipline. Participating in departmental honors enhances students’ chances for obtaining fellowships and admission to graduate school. Minimum GPA requirements for participation in departmental honors vary by department, but usually fall within the range of 3.30-3.50. Students may enter the Honors Program at almost any stage in their academic career, including at the junior (and sometimes senior) level. The campus-wide Honors Program, which is open to all qualified students regardless of major, offers a rich array of cultural and social activities, special classes, and the benefit of Honors early registration. Interested students should contact the Honors Program, Main 15, (435) 797-2715, honors@usu.edu. Additional information can be found online at: http://www.usu.edu/honors/

Additional Information

For detailed information about requirements for majors and minors within the Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication Department, see the major requirement sheets, which are available from the department.

Languages

Language faculty members in the Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication teach courses leading to undergraduate degrees in French, German, and Spanish, as well as to undergraduate minors in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Teaching emphases and minors are also offered in French, German, and Spanish. The department also offers a minor program in Linguistics. Other languages taught through the department include Arabic (with on-campus classes), as well as Korean and Italian, which are taught through Distance Education (see http://distance.usu.edu).

Sample Four-year Plans

Sample semester-by-semester four-year plans for students working toward a Bachelor of Arts degree in French, German, or Spanish can be found in the department.

Students should consult with their advisor to develop a plan of study tailored to their individual needs and interests.

Proficiency Tests, Placement in Language Courses, and Obtaining Credit by Special Examination

Students who have completed one or more years of language study in French, German, Russian, or Spanish may take the CAPE proficiency tests offered by the Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication to determine proximate placement in language courses. After taking the test, French, German, Russian, and Spanish testers have the option of buying 4-16 language credits and may get help with authorization and placement in a language course.

(Note: In order to purchase these language credits, a student must be an active student, have a USU “A” number, and be a current student enrolled in one or more courses at Utah State University.)

Students with skills beyond the basic level in Chinese or Japanese should take a departmental placement test for those languages. Also, after taking the test and receiving authorization for placement in a class, they need to take a Chinese or Japanese class and earn an A or B in that class in order to purchase any of the 5-20 lower-division credits. The language class needs to be at a higher level than the credits to be acquired.

Students with skills beyond the basic level in Portuguese, Italian, or Korean need to contact the departmental office to obtain authorization and help into the Portuguese, Italian, or Korean course available. Portuguese is available as a regular class. Italian and Korean are available as Distance Education classes. After taking the higher-level class that is available and getting an A or B in that class, students can purchase 4-16 lower-division credits in that language.

Students who are proficient in a language not offered at USU (the list is available in Main 204) may receive up to 16 semester P or Pass credits by taking a foreign language proficiency test administered by BYU. Tests are offered at BYU once each semester (fall, spring, and summer). Students interested in taking this test should register online at http://flats.byu.edu/

(Note: In order to purchase these language credits, a student must be an active student, have a USU “A” number, and be a current student enrolled in one or more courses at Utah State University.)

These testing credits will count as transfer credits. They will not count toward a certain semester or the USU GPA, but will be counted into the cumulative GPA. For further details, students should e-mail the department at lpsc@usu.edu or call (435) 797-1209.

Technology Assisted Language Center

The department operates a technology assisted language center, located in Main 004, for instructional use associated with language classes, and for students desiring additional language practice outside of the classroom. The center includes computer workstations capable of running multimedia applications, as well as audio equipment.

Exchange Programs, Semester Abroad Programs, and Summer Study Abroad Programs

The Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication assists students with academic advising for study abroad exchange programs, semester abroad programs, and summer study abroad programs. Students must be in good standing at the University, and it is recommended that the students have some language preparation in order to participate in these programs. Students desiring to count study abroad credits toward a major or minor in this department must obtain approval for these courses prior to their participation in the study abroad program. For more information, contact the departmental office at (435) 797-1209 or visit the Languages, Philosophy, and Speech Communication Department Study Abroad Programs website at: http://lpsc.usu.edu/default.asp?id=282

For other study abroad program information, contact the USU Study Abroad Office, Taggart Student Center 311, or visit the Study Abroad Programs website at: http://www.usu.edu/studyabroad/

National Honor Societies

Lambda Pi Eta (LPH) is the National Communication Honor Society of the National Communication Association for undergraduate junior and senior communication students. Among the goals of LPH are to recognize, foster, and reward outstanding scholastic achievement; and to provide an opportunity for faculty and students to discuss and exchange ideas about their field of interest.

Sigma Delta Pi (SDP) is the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese for students studying Spanish. Among the goals of SDP are to honor those who attain excellence in the study of the Spanish language and of the literature and culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples, and to encourage college and university students to acquire a greater interest in and a deeper understanding of Hispanic culture.

Phi Sigma Iota (PSI) is an international language honor society for juniors, seniors, and graduate students who excel in foreign language. PSI promotes international communication and understanding, as well as a sentiment of unity among nations. Phi Sigma Iota helps members further their training through scholarship and graduation honors. The society also promotes trips abroad.

Philosophy

Philosophy at USU reflects the ideals of the liberal arts in encouraging the respect for truth without promoting dogmatism, and in offering the opportunity for students to increase their self-understanding at the same time as they increase their knowledge of the world around them.

Philosophy faculty in the Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication teach courses leading to an undergraduate major and a minor in philosophy. The mission of the Philosophy program at Utah State University is to provide a high-quality education leading to an understanding of the major areas of inquiry represented within the discipline of philosophy. Coursework emphasizes the areas of the history of philosophy, logic, ethical theory and applied ethics, and metaphysics and epistemology. The curriculum is designed to meet a wide variety of student interests in pursuing a major in philosophy. It provides a rigorous foundation for students intending to further their education in law school or graduate school in philosophy, and it also provides an exciting and challenging education for those students who enjoy thinking about ideas for their own sake. Coursework is also designed to enrich the education of students majoring in other subjects, by providing them with opportunities to gain an understanding of philosophical perspectives on and philosophical foundations of their chosen fields. Note: As you plan for your general education and major courses, note that PHIL 4530  will not satisfy the DSC General Education Depth Requirement but if you take ADVS 3200 , it will satisfy the DSC and count for a Philosophy elective.

Sample Four-year Plans for Philosophy Major

Sample semester-by-semester four-year plans for students working toward a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Philosophy or Philosophy with a Concentration in Ethics are avilable in the department.

Students should consult with their advisor to develop a plan of study tailored to their individual needs and interests.

Speech Communication

Speech Communication has been taught continuously at USU almost from the University’s founding in 1888. Speech Communication faculty in the Department of Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication teach courses leading to a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Speech, as well as to minors in Organizational Communication and Speech Communication Teaching.

This major focuses on how people communicate to create meanings across a wide range of contexts, including interactions that occur in personal relationships and public interactions, with those from other cultures, and with those in business and other applied settings. Students learn to think critically about the messages they receive and to develop skills promoting the understanding and practice of effective and ethical communication behaviors.

Students majoring in speech are encouraged to earn a BA degree by completing two years of study in a foreign language. This broadens cultural and social awareness and can increase one’s understanding of the nature of language in general.

Admission to the speech major will be limited to 25 students each year. Admission decisions will be based on (1) academic record, (2) realistic career or professional study objective, (3) ability of this program to prepare the student for intended career, (4) satisfactory speaking and writing competencies, and (5) motivation and creativity demonstrated by class performance, work experience, volunteer activities, and other means offered by the student during the application process.

Students not admitted may apply the following year. If not admitted on the second application, the student will be permitted to complete a minor, but will not be considered again for the major.

To obtain guidelines for applying to the speech major, contact the Department of Languages, Philosophy, and Speech Communication, Main 204, (435) 797-1209.

The minor program in Organizational Communication is designed for students who seek communication and human relations competencies, an understanding of human communication behavior, and the critical thinking skills required for success in a variety of careers.

The course of study leading to a minor in Speech Communication Teaching is designed to develop the communication competencies and the understanding of communication processes and theory necessary for effective high school speech communication instruction. Prior to student teaching, the program features practicum experience in which students learn how to critique and coach speech communication students.

Note: A Speech DSS course will not satisfy the DSS (Depth Social Sciences) General Education requirement for a Speech Major.

Pre-Speech Major. Since admission to the speech major is limited to 25 students per year, students not yet admitted to the speech major will be allowed to enter a pre-speech major. While a student in the pre-speech major is waiting to be admitted into the speech major, he or she should complete SPCH 1020  (Public Speaking) and SPCH 2110  (Interpersonal Communication). For more information about the application process for the speech major, contact the Department of Languages, Philosophy, and Speech Communication. Each semester new applicants will be considered for admission to the speech major.

Sample Four-year Plan for Speech Major

A sample semester-by-semester four-year plan for students working toward a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Speech can be found in the department.

Students should consult with their advisor to develop a plan of study tailored to their individual needs and interests.

Languages, Philosophy and Speech Communication Faculty

Professors
Bradford ‘J’ Hall, intercultural communication and communication theory
Charlie Huenemann, history of modern philosophy, Kant, metaphysics
John S. Seiter, interpersonal communication, intercultural relations, social influence
Richard Sherlock, medical and environmental ethics, ethical theory, ethical issues in genetics, political philosophy, philosophy of religion

Professors Emeritus
Lynn R. Eliason, 19th century Russian and German novels, Russian culture
Mark D. Larsen, Latin American literature, computer applications in languages
Hans K. Mussler, German literature, Lessing, enlightenment, translation, teaching methodology
Kent E. Robson, ethics, philosophy of language, history of philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion
Alfred N. Smith, Jr., French, foreign language education, cross-cultural studies

Associate Professors
María-de Jesús Cordero, colonial Spanish-American literature
Javier Domínguez-García, Spanish medieval and golden age
Sarah Gordon, medieval French
Taira Koybaeva, intercultural communication, linguistics
Steve Nelson (USU-CEU) Spanish language
Jennifer A. Peeples, environmental rhetoric
Cacilda Rego, Brazilian film, cultural studies
J. P. Spicer-Escalante, 19th century Latin American literature
Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante, Hispanic applied linguistics
Gordon Steinhoff, philosophy of science, logic, metaphysics

Associate Professors Emeritus
Jerry L. Benbow, Peninsular Spanish literature and grammar
Lynne H. Goodhart, 20th century French poetry, women in literature
Ilona Jappinen, German language, literature and culture, Nietzsche expressionism
Harold J. Kinzer, organizational communication
Gordon E. Porter, Spanish, Spanish literature, Portuguese
Norman R. Savoie, contemporary French culture, contemporary French detective fiction
Janet C. Stock, French, business French, 20th century French literature, Proust

Assistant Professors
Abdulkafi Albirini, Arabic language and culture
Marcus Brasileiro, Brazilian literature
Li Guo, Chinese language and culture, Chinese women's narratives
Erica Holberg, philosophy, ethics
Christa Jones, French, contemporary francophone studies
Doris McGonagill, German literature from the 18th through 21st Century, contemporary German culture
David F. Richter, 20th and 21st Century Spanish literature, Hispanic poetics
Aaron Roggia, syntax, phonology, language contact, bilingualism and language attrition
Matthew Sanders, organizational communication
Ko-Yin Sung, Chinese as a foreign language, Chinese as a heritage language, language learning strategies
Joshua Thoms, linguistics, Spanish language

Senior Lecturer
Karin de Jonge-Kannan, second language acquisition
Kevin L. Krogh, Spanish

Lecturers
Atsuko O. Neely, Japanese, second language acquisition
 

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